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Grand Designs

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“This is a very large project. It’s essentially a city,” explains Moshe Safdie & Assoicatesdesigner Jaron Lubin, who was part of the design process from the beginning. The Marina Bay Sands development spreads across a six-million square-foot footprint, containing casinos and hotels, a 54,000-capacity convention center, an Art/Science museum, a mall, two large theaters, and six signature restaurants.

To ensure the on-time delivery of the massive submission and to keep track of all the design output, the team tried a somewhat different approach to project management. The designers’ strategy was to maintain the entire project in a 3D master model. “We started to develop our 3D models right away,” Lubin explains.

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Q&A: Pushing Visual Limits of 3D

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Part-time Model

In their spare time, husband-wife visual effects team create stunning, lifelike renderings of historical Seattle landmarks.

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Cab of the Capitol

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Meet El Chapulín:

It may be surprising to learn that London is the only major city to have a vehicle especially built as a taxi. In all other places, a cab is not much more than a sedan with a paint job and a meter bolted to the dash. But soon London won’t be the only city with a distinctive taxi of its own. The government of Mexico City recently selected a winning design from 76 submissions.

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Slipstream

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If your architectural project scrapes the atmosphere, you will likely need the rarified services of a company like Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin (RWDI). This Toronto-based consulting firm has provided wind engineering, environmental air quality and noise management services for many of the largest architectural projects in the world, from Taipei 101 in Taiwan (currently the world’s tallest building) to Burj Dubai in the Middle East (which will soon take over the title) to Daniel Libeskind’s Freedom Tower at New York’s World Trade Center site.

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Universal Changes

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Few product designers have a more conscious emphasis on process than the New York/San-Francisco/Barcelona consultants of Smart Design. The progenitors of the “universal design” movement in the 1980s, Smart Design today starts each project with extensive research into every aspect of product life, including its ergonomic use, brand identity, and on-the-shelf appeal. Smart Design maintains a close dialogue with its clients to find an innovative and exacting solution for a new market opportunity, whether it is a sophisticated handheld device or simple household tool.

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Curves Without the Cost

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Wood Builder AWI adopts 3D in construction processes

Advancements in 3D design tools have given manufacturers tremendous productivity gains over the last two decades. Automotive development, for example, is nothing like it was twenty years ago. In this industry, not just styling and engineering revolve around 3D data, but downstream factory processes have evolved to take advantage of the efficiencies that 3D technology offers.

One would think 3D CAD should provide the same benefits to the field of architecture and construction. Architects would have a wider palette of forms for expression – curvatures and non-rectilinear textures; contractors would have clearer visuals and less confusion, delays, and overruns when erecting complicated structures.

But for the most part, these benefits have not emerged.

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Building a Better Transmission

Inventor John Bisby’s quest for the ultimate CVT

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Topologica

A SMART approach to integrated 3D analysis at Buro Happold By Brett Duesing, Obleo Design Media As one of the largest engineering consultancies in the world, Buro Huppold crosses continents — with 15 offices throughout Europe, the US, and the Middle East – as well as disciplines, offering its clients solutions to nearly any design, [...]

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Boarder Crossing

Italian innovators design a multi-tool for the waves, slopes, and streets By Alex Dickey and Brett Duesing “Snowboarding is very popular on the Alps,” says Max Bonassi snowboard designer at the Milan-based Comvert. “The main difference between Europe and the U.S. is the consistency of the snow. Here we mostly ride on hard pack. Rarely [...]

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Making Good

Products rather than politics may be the answer to the needs of the developing world.

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